How To Choose A Toilet

Okay, so maybe it’s not something you think of everyday. But it is something you use everyday.

In 1994, the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 went into effect for all residential toilets, requiring that all toilets made and sold in the U.S. meet water efficiency standards. Those standards set the upper limit of a single flush at 1.6 gallons of water.

So while you don’t have a choice as to the flush capacity, you do have choices in design.

Shape
Toilets are available with either an elongated front or a round front. Round front bowls are shorter in length than elongated bowls, and are suitable for smaller, more compact spaces.

Toilets can either be one piece or two. A one piece toilet provides a seamless look, where the tank and the bowl are seamed together. It has a smoother appearance and is easier to clean. Two piece toilets have a separate tank and bowl. They are usually less stylish and less expensive.

Flushing System
Today’s toilets are either gravity fed or pressure assisted. Gravity fed toilets use water to push everything from the tank into the bowl, then back up through an S shaped trap, where pull action empties the bowl and finishes the flush. Pressure assisted toilets fills the tank with water and air, forcing the water into the bowl with a pressurized release. In general, a pressure assisted toilet till be noisier and tougher to repair than their gravity fed counterpart.

Appearance
Proper function is paramount in making your decision. At the same time, the appearance also plays a part in your selection. Many models, styles and color choices are available in a variety of sizes. Visiting your local hardware store can provide you with a starting point. Also ask your plumber, who will have a variety of options and choices for you as well.

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